Dr. Sanjay Srivastava | Department of Sociology

Profile

Dr. Sanjay
Srivastava
Research Professor
Department of Sociology
School of Humanities and Social Sciences (SHSS)
Shiv Nadar University
India
Profile Summary 

Sanjay Srivastava is an anthropologist. His research interests include urban cultures, consumerism, middle-class cultures and the relationship between new forms of work and identity. His publications include Constructing Post-colonial India. National Character and the Doon School (Routledge, 1998); Passionate Modernity. Sexuality, Class and Consumption in India (Routledge, 2007) Entangled Urbanism. Slum, Gated Community and Shopping Mall in Delhi in Gurgaon (OUP, 2015) and Masculinity, Consumerism, and the Post-national Indian City: Streets, Neighbourhoods, Home (forthcoming 2022, Cambridge University Press). Sanjay is currently involved in several individual and collaborative research projects. These include ‘Imagined Futures: Technology, Urban Planning and their Subjects at the Margins of an Indian Megapolis’; ‘Gendered Violence and Urban Transformations in India and South Africa’; and ‘Religion, Consumer Cultures and the City in India’. From 2012-206, he was co-editor of the journal Contributions to Indian Sociology.

Educational Qualifications 
MA (Economics)
Delhi School of Economics
Ph.D. (Anthropology)
University of Sydney
Work Experience 
Personal Chair,
Deakin University,
Melbourne
Professor of Sociology,
Institute of Economic Growth,
Delhi
British Academy Global Professor,
University College London,
London
Teaching & Research Interests: 
  1. Urbanism and cultures of the city
  2. Consumerism and the new middle-classes.
  3. New forms of work and youth cultures.
  4. Masculinities and culture.
Awards(Selected): 

British Academy Global Professor, University College London. Awarded by The British Academy.

Gendered Violence and Urban Transformations in India and South Africa, with Dr. Manali Desai (Cambridge University), Dr. Nandini Gooptu (Oxford University), Dr. Kammila Naidoo (University of Johannesburg) and Dr Lyn Ossome (Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University). Awarded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

‘Learning from Small Cities: Governing Imagined Futures and the Dynamics of Change in India’s ‘Smart’ Urban Age. Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC, UK) and the Indian Council or Social Science Research (ICSSR, India) under the Newton Grant Scheme. In collaboration with Prof. Ayona Datta, University College, London, Prof. Melissa Butcher, Birkbeck College, London, Dr. Ritajyoti Bandyopadhyay, IISER-Mohali and Dr. Sophie Hadfield-Hill, University of Birmingham.

British Academy Visiting Professor, King’s College London.

Religion and Urbanity: Processes of Formation. Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). In collaboration with Professor Martin Fuchs (University of Erfurt, German).

Visiting Professor and Scholar-in-Residence, Centre for South Asia, Stanford University.

Scholarly Activity

Books & Book Chapters

2022

(Forthcoming) Masculinity and the Post-National Indian City: Streets, Neighbourhoods, Home and Consumerism. Cambridge University Press.

2021

‘New Urbanism and the Remaking of Citizenship, Class and “Community”’, in Sujata Patel (ed.) Neoliberalism, Urbanization and Aspirations in Contemporary India. Oxford and Delhi: Oxford University Press.

2021

‘Spatial Politics: Sociality, “Transparency” and Ideas of Community in Delhi and Gurgaon’, in Sanjoy Chakravorty and Neelanjan Sircar (eds.) Colossus—The Anatomy of India’s National Capital Region. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

2021

‘Voice, Gender and Space in the Time of the Five-Year Plans’, in Ranjana Dave (ed.) Improvised Futures. Encountering the Body in Performance. Tulika Books (Delhi) and Columbia University Press (New York).

2020

‘Transitions in India’s City-Making: New Urbanism and the Remaking of Citizenship, Class and Community’, in Chanwahn Kim and Rajiv Kumar (eds.) Great Transition in India. Singapore: World Scientific.

2019

(Co-Editor) Critical Theme in Indian Sociology. Sage.

2019

(co-editor) Histories of Desire: Sexualities and Culture in Modern India. Cambridge University Press.

2019

‘Negotiating Governance, accommodating Informality’, in Ash Amin (ed.) Governing the Plural City. London and New Delhi: The British Academy and The National Institute for Urban Affairs.

2019

(Co-author) ‘Introduction: Sexuality and Sexualities’, in R. Kumaramkandath and S. Srivastava (eds.) (Hi) Stories of Desire: Sexualities and Culture in Modern India. Delhi: Cambridge University Press.

2019

(Co-author) ‘Introduction’, in S. Srivastava, Y. Arif and J. Abraham (eds.) Critical Themes in Indian Sociology. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

2019

‘Post-national Urbanism: “Ordinary” People, Capital and the State’, in Sujata Patel and Omita Goel (eds.), India’s Contemporary Urban Conundrum. Routledge.

2019

‘’Masculinity, Sexuality and Culture: Entangled Narratives’, in Anu Aneja (ed.) Women’s and Gender Studies in India. Routledge.

2019

 ‘The Class Divide’, in Niraja Jayal Gopal (ed.) The Politics of Change. Penguin India.

2018

‘Masculinity Studies and Feminism: Othering the Self, Engaging Theory’, in Romit Chowdhury and Zaid Al-Baset (eds.), Men and Feminism in India. Routledge.

2018

‘New Urbanism, Post-nationalism and Consumer Culture in India’, in Olga Kravets, Pauline Maclaran, Steven Miles and Alladi Venkatesh (eds.), The Sage Handbook of Consumer Culture. Sage.

2017

‘Divine Markets: Post-nationalism, Religion and Moral Consumption in India’, in Filippo Osella and Daromir Rudnyckyj (eds.), Religion and the Morality of Markets. Cambridge University Press.

2017

'Gated Spaces, Commodity Cultures and the Politics of Gender’, in Manjeet Bhatia (ed.) Locating Gender in the New Middle-Class in India. Sage.

2015

Entangled Urbanism: Slum, Gated Community and Shopping Mall in Delhi and Gurgaon. Oxford University Press.

2013

(Contributing Editor) Sexuality Studies. Oxford University Press.

2007

Passionate Modernity. Sexuality, Class and Consumption in India. Routledge.

2004

(Contributing Editor) Sexual Sites, Seminal Attitudes: Sexualities, Masculinities and Culture in South Asia. Sage.

2001

(Co-Author) Asia: Cultural Politics in the Global Age. Allen and Unwin and Palgrave.

1998

Constructing Post-colonial India: National Character and the Doon School. Routledge.

Journal Publications (accepted or published)

2022

(Forthcoming) ‘Relation Flexibility: Skills, “Personality development” and the Limits of Theorising Neoliberalism in India’. American Ethnologist.

2020

‘Hindu Majoritarianism, Forms of Capital, and Urban Politics The making of a new ordinary citizen in India’, HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, 10 (3): 742-749.

‘On the Merits of Recognising the Near-impossibility of Dialogue’, Dialogues in Human Geography, Vol 8(2): 132-137.

2016

‘Natives, Subjects, Consumers: Postcolonial Masculinities: Masculinities and Change: Notes on Continuities and Transformations in Indian Masculine Cultures’, Masculinities & Social Change (in English and Spanish), 5 (1): 1–27.

2015

'Masculinity Studies and Feminism. Othering the Self.’ Special issue on ‘Men doing Feminist Research’, edited by Romit Chowdhury and Zaid Al-Baset, Economic and Political Weekly, Volume L, Number 20: 33–36.

2015

‘Modi-masculinity: Media, Manhood and ‘Traditions’ in a Time of Consumerism’, Television and New Media, Volume 16, Number 4: 331–338.

2013

‘Thrilling Affects: Sexuality, Masculinity, the City and “Indian Traditions” in the Contemporary Hindi “Detective” Novel’, special issue of Interventions. Journal of Post-Colonial Studies, Volume 15, Issue 4: 567–585.

2012

‘Duplicity, Intimacy, Community: Of Identity Cards, Permits and Other Fake Documents in Delhi’, Thesis Eleven. Critical Theory and Historical Sociology, Volume 113, issue 1: 1–16. 

2010

‘Fragmentary Pleasures: Masculinity, Urban Spaces and Commodity Politics in Delhi’, Journal of Royal Anthropological Institute (N.S.), 16: 835–852.

2010

‘“Revolution Forever”: Consumerism and Object Lessons for the Urban Poor’, Contributions to Indian Sociology, 44 (1 & 2): 103–28.